Day 15 Wonderopolis improved–Questions 3 & 4

Today we discuss Questions 3 & 4 for our Wonderopolis improved project. Make sure for each question, there is at least one person present to represent his/her group.

Question 3 (Discussion starts at 11:05 am)

How can your students evaluate possible conflicting information, or the trustworthiness of a particular source?

Agenda:

  • How’s the group work going?
  • Please briefly summarize your group’s takeaway from the previous day.
  • What is your anticipation of your students’ reaction to conflicting information?
    • What do you do when you observe that some students are very entrenched in one perspective?
    • What do you plan to do when your students don’t agree with each other?
  • What are the ways such conflicts can be resolved? Is there a best way? Or do you have a list of recommendations?
  • Any other questions you may have.

Question 4 (Discussion starts at 11:40 am)

How do you present your answers to the previous questions in the form of an improved version of the wonder of your choice? (You decide how it looks, and what technology you want to use.)

Agenda:

  • Before class, research for possible presentation solutions that we don’t see used in our classrooms often.
  • What are the most important aspect of your projects? These should stand out in your presentation.
    • What would be a really good way to present these?
  • Do you need any technical support? Your classmates may be able to help. And I’ll definitely try to help you.
  • Any other questions you may have.

Preparing for Thursday

  1. Thursday’s class meeting is optional. Find somewhere to do your group work, be it our classroom or some other place.
  2. We present on the Tuesday after the Spring Break.
  3. The last project of this semester is about technology integration in real schools. Get back in touch with your grade school teachers early to avoid their Spring Breaks.
  4. Please update your 3rd Genius Hour post before Spring Break.
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Day 14 Wonderopolis improved–Questions 1 & 2

Today we discuss Questions 1 & 2 for our Wonderopolis improved project. Make sure for each question, there is at least one person present to represent his/her group.

Question 1 (Discussion starts at 11:05 am)

How do you challenge your students to think critically about the information provided by Wonderopolis? What questions are you going to ask? (How do you define critical thinking?)

Agenda:

  • What wonder have you chosen?
  • How do group members communicate?
  • How do you collaborate/cooperate?
  • Who are your hypothetical students? What are their defining characteristics?
  • What does “critical thinking” mean to you?
  • What difficulties do you anticipate in getting your students to think critically? What do you plan to do if they don’t seem to think critically?
  • And any other questions you may have.

Question 2 (Discussion starts at 11:40 am)

What are the possible resources your students can use? What are the possible activities your students can do?

Agenda:

  • What are the possible resources for your students to use? Let’s brainstorm for them!
  • Now let’s brainstorm for activities that you can possibly use to get your students to research on the topic/keep engaged in the topic/do whatever you think is beneficial.
  • Where do you predict your students will find potential conflicts in the information they find? (e.g., book vs. interview, or experiments under different conditions.)
  • Any other questions you may have.

Day 13 MakerSpace sharing & introduction to Wonderopolis

Pre-class video: Maker Faire Atlanta 2015

MakerSpace artifacts sharing

Get prepared to show your artifacts to guest EDIT 2000 students! Tell them what you made and how you felt about it.

After the guests left, we will show our artifacts with our own classmates, table by table. You are welcome to walk around the classroom to take a closer look.

Reflection

In this Google doc, please write about what went well and what could be improved with your creative process for this MakerSpace project.

Once everyone finishes typing, please take a look at what others wrote, and for the person right below you in the Google doc, use bold to indicate what you think are commonalities in our class, and color to indicate what you find intriguing and/or surprising.

Introducing Wonderopolis

Our next project is Wonderopolis improved.

At the beginning of the semester I asked you to read our first reading: Goal of Technology Integrations: Meaningful Learning. I didn’t ask you to read past p.9, but on p.10 you’ll find ISTE’s National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making. This project, unsurprisingly, is about critical thinking.

We also read the new ISTE standarsd for students, and there we can find:

capturewhich focuses more on what students need to be able to do with information.

Now take a look at the Wonderopolis website. You should be able to figure out what they are about in a minute or two.

There’s certainly a lot of information on Wonderopolis, and I think they are doing a great job curating information for real problems–that is, if you trust them. There’s no reason to credit or discredit a source before we think critical about it, so here we go–

Project guidelines

For this project:

  • Get into groups of 2~4. (4 works best, but we can’t all be groups of 4 in this class of 21 students…)
  • Find a wonder (on Wonderopolis, of course) that interest you–and, assuming you are teaching some one and that your hypothetical students are already interested in this topic, consider:
    1. How do you challenge your students to think critically about the information provided by Wonderopolis? What questions are you going to ask? (How do you define critical thinking?)
    2. What are the possible resources your students can use? What are the possible activities your students can do?
    3. How can your students evaluate possible conflicting information, or the trustworthiness of a particular source?
  • What is you answer to the questions above (and any questions that you think are relevant to the ISTE standards for students)? Present your answers in the form of an improved version of the wonder of your choice. (You decide how it looks, and what technology you want to use. I recommend you try out annotation tools such as Genius and Hypothes.is).

Since this is a group project, you may want to find ways to collaborate or cooperate. For the following 4 class sessions:

  • Thursday, Feb. 23: discussions about questions 1 and 2 (discussion of question 1 starts at 11:00 am, and discussion of question 2 starts at 11:40 am)
  • Tuesday, Feb. 28: discussions about questions 3 and 4 (the same schedule as above)
  • Thursday, Mar. 2: optional group work
  • Spring Break
  • Tuesday, Mar. 14: project presentation

For each of the 4 questions (the first 2 days), I only need one person from each group to come to class to represent your group (and I don’t mind if it’s the same person or 4 different people). This person should then communicate with the group, so the next representative will know what has been discussed in previous sessions.

You can find the 4 questions here: https://ouredit2000.wordpress.com/project-wonderopolis-improved-2/

Make sure you send at least one person for each discussion, else it’s 10% off for each discussion missed.

What to do today before you leave

  1. Form groups for the Wonderopolis project, and register with me here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/15818bhkCLQMsA0x_5qhHlkGrux6WUFYn40OPT6G9CVQ/edit?usp=sharing
  2. Decide who will come to which class for which discussion.

Prepare for Thursday

  1. Come to class if you represent your group!
  2. Set up a shared working document for your group.
  3. As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

Day 10 Tools for MakerSpace

Sculpting Tywin Lannister–a timelapse video

Creating 2D images for laser cutting

We will be using Inkscape–a vector drawing program–to prepare an image that we can then feed to the laser cutter.

  1. Find an image you want to engrave (on a piece of wood, for example). This is the one I’m using:
    dawg-memorial-day
  2. Trace it with Inkscape (see tutorial: https://inkscape.org/en/doc/tracing/tutorial-tracing.html)
  3. Draw a box around the traced image. Set “fill” to “none” and “stroke” to “flat color.” This provides the outline for the laser cutter.
  4. (Optional) Resizing the canvas to fit the image: (Menu->File->Document Properties)
    resize
  5. Export the image to png (Menu->File->Export PNG Image)
  6. Save the file as an svg (Menu->File->Save)
  7. Store both files in your Google drive on a flash drive so you can access them in our MakerSpace.

Creating 3D models for 3D printing

If you want to build organic-looking models, use Sculptris

Try out the tools. They are pretty intuitive. You can learn from this tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6K-U5AlaGwc, and you can find many more on YouTube.

Export your model to an OBJ file.

If you want to build rigid-looking models, use Tinkercad

And they have nice tutorials on their site: https://www.tinkercad.com/about/learn

Export your model to either an STL or an OBJ file.

The easy (but maybe less exciting) way out

Go to Thingiverse.com and download a model to print. If your download is a compressed ZIP file, you can usually find an STL file inside.

Preparing for next week

We are NOT meeting in class next week, since I will leave for a conference.

  • Go to our MakerSpace in the Science Library during the week and make something (a laser cut, a 3D print–your choice). Enjoy yourselves. I will not grade your project on the quality of the product. You live with what you make 🙂
  • Take a photo of yourself in the MakerSpace and tweet it.
  • Bring what you made to class on Tuesday, Feb. 21. We will have visitors!

Science Library floor map: http://www.libs.uga.edu/floormaps/science_secondfloor.pdf. Ask circulation if you can’t find the MakerSpace. The MakerSpace is open from 9AM to 10PM Monday through Thursday, and from 9AM to 6PM Fridays. They are closed on Weekends.

Day 09 Presentations and MakerSpace

Pre-class video: The Makerspace At Lee Elementary–It’s pretty cool!

Presentations: StoryCorps learning activity design

We present in the following order (but let me know if your group wants to go first):

  1. Piper De Maine and Rachel Hartz
  2. Rebecca Marshall, Meagan Mwanda, and Grace Stevenson
  3. Jenna Currin and Rebecca Erwin
  4. Em McClure, Jonathan Sweat, and Reggie Wilkerson
  5. Lacy Stuart, Koby Pyrz, and Sebastian Rendon
  6. Mary Elizabeth Nipper, Lindsey Powell, Emmy Patrick, and Jeremiah Holloman
  7. Ali, Golda, Katie, and Mackenzie

Our presentation document is here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1aeo8inVblMQ1qweBNSRn-KnDwrGyuzGao408eyFCnb0/edit?usp=sharing

Next project: MakerSpace

We have a change of schedule. We will push back Stop Motion animation till after Spring Break. For now, we are doing MakerSpace.

Do you know we have a MakerSpace on campus? It is on the second floor of the Science Library.

What is a MakerSpace? While it can mean many things, here at UGA: (I’m borrowing an image from their website)

remakerspace2

Check out MakerSpace at UGA here: http://guides.libs.uga.edu/makerspace/gettingstarted

For our EDIT 2000 class, we will focus on 3D printing and laser cutting.

What is 3D printing?

There are many ways to print in 3D today. Here at UGA our MakerSpace offers printing with plastic filaments. Whatever the technology, the idea of 3D printing as of today is to create shape layer by layer (which is called “additive manufacturing”). Here is plastic filament printing in action:

What is laser cutting?

This one is pretty self-explanatory. Still, what may not be so obvious is that a laser cutter does at least two jobs: cutting, which divides the material into two pieces, and engraving, which cuts or burns the material and leaves a mark, but does not completely cut through.

Preparing for Thursday

While there are so many creative things you can do with 3D printing and laser cutting, there are a few free tools to get you quickly started. We will test out the tools on Thursday, but to make sure you have the software to work with, please download and install the following before class:

  1. Download and install Inkscape: https://inkscape.org/en/download/
  2. Do one of the following (or both, and decide which one you want to use later):