Day 07 StoryCorps group work

Presentation (continued)

We have a few presentations left from last week: Jenna, Sebastian, Katie, Ali, and Jeremiah.

Our presentation document: https://docs.google.com/document/d/17Vx3rIQykiB3-OpGBYnpDK0ngpOlmoj6WDPN2mZbZRw/edit?usp=sharing

StoryCorps learning activity design

Please post your interview to your WordPress portfolio page:

My StorpCorps interview on (or something similar)

Link to the interview

For guidelines on the rest of the project, look here.

Form groups of 3, and register your groups with me here.

Getting started with brainstorming

So this isn’t new at all: How many uses can you find for a paper clip?

320px-paperclip-01_28xndr29

In groups, come up with creative ideas, and after 3 minutes of discussion, name one idea to the class that you think has the best chance of being unique among the groups.

Preparing for Thursday

  1. We will present the activities to the class on Thursday next Tuesday.
    • Remember to keep your presentations between 5 to 10 minutes.
  2. As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.
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Day 06 Citizen Scientist presentations

Is there a reason to learn another language now? …

Presentations

At the beginning of the semester you registered your Citizen Scientist project with me in this Google doc: https://docs.google.com/document/d/17Vx3rIQykiB3-OpGBYnpDK0ngpOlmoj6WDPN2mZbZRw/edit?usp=sharing

Please check if you have provided the necessary information.

We present from the last person on the list and up. As usually, please write something nice and/or constructive for your classmates if you are not presenting.

StoryCorps learning activity design

I know I asked you to post the link to your interview in this Google form, which isn’t that terrible an idea. But it looks like you wouldn’t have a chance to double check your link this way. So instead, please post your interview to your WordPress portfolio page:

My StorpCorps interview on <Name of Interviewee> (or something similar)

Link to the interview

For guidelines on the rest of the project, look here.

Genius Hour

Tell me about your idea for Genius Hour here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdmbYU1IFcf9OY3wApPy-M2sLz1r3M8g0J-XS0mFd_QJn7g9g/viewform. Most likely your idea will be fine. If not, I will let you know before Saturday.

Create a new post on your WordPress and write about this idea. For the project description, look here.

Preparing for next week

  1. We will spend the Tuesday session working in groups on the StoryCorps learning activity design.
  2. We will present the activities to the class on Thursday.
  3. Write your first Genius Hour post. It’s not supposed to be a time-consuming writing task. I’m only expecting a few hundred words, although I wouldn’t mind reading a book if that’s what you plan to write!
  4. As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

Reminder

We are not meeting in class today. Use the time on the following tasks:

  1. Prepare your Citizen Scientist presentation. We present on Thursday.
  2. Interview using the StoryCorps app, and upload your interview from within the app.
  3. Consider ideas for your Genius Hour

All project descriptions can be found from the menu on the left, under “Projects”

Day 05 StoryCorps

UDL continued

Multiple means of representation

Last time I asked you to come up with examples of learning experiences where additional types of representations could help you better understand. You can access the “examples” here: https://padlet.com/leh858/djdxsiatg4so

Multiple means of action & expression

Read the following Twitter novel:

“It’s a miracle he survived,” said the doctor. “It was God’s will,” said Mrs Schicklgruber. “What will you call him?” “Adolf,” she replied.–Jeffrey Archer (originality somewhat disputed)

If our purpose is to teach students about composition, there is little reason why we should ask students to write their story in this particular format. Not all students like this format to begin with. What other means of expression can you think of? For example. I’d probably write a poem.

Now let’s give this principle a try. We will use Common Core standards as examples. In four groups, try to think of at least one non-standardized-testing way to let students express their knowledge about or skills in a certain standard. The standard we will work on is this:

Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. (CCSS.Math.Content.5.MD.C.3)

Write down your ideas here: https://padlet.com/leh858/f33pfoeq3x0j

Multiple means of engagement

We have done enough posting today, so for this UDL concept, we will fall back to traditional group discussion:

  • Are there things more exciting than learning (at school)?
  • Do you learn anything from these exciting activities (I assume these are activities…)? (And I’m not saying learning cannot be your most exciting activity…)
  • Can we transplant some features of these exciting activities to learning (at school)?

We share our ideas in class after 5 minutes.

You may want to look into this concept called “gamification.” Here is an example.

Introducing StoryCorps

StoryCorps is about hearing and recording people’s stories. StoryCorps also provides the technology for one to easily interview people and then upload the interview to be archived forever. In EDIT 2000 we use StoryCorps as a piece of technology to listen to people’s small “t” version of truth. Remember?

Some of us listened to a StoryCorps interview before our second meeting. Here’s another one if you were not there then (and you are certainly not required to come to class early!)

https://storycorps.org/listen/ezra-awumey-and-sam-harmon/

The project description can be found here or from the menu.

Here’s a video tutorial on how to use StoryCorps.

Proposed project timeline:

  1. By Jan. 26, finish your interview.
  2. On Jan. 26, get ready to discuss StoryCorps-based learning activity ideas (in groups of 3).
  3. On Feb. 2, share your learning activity design with the rest of the class.

Genius Hour

The Genius Hour project is a semester-long project that helps you and allows you to think meaningfully and take action about personal interests that may offer (educational) value.

The idea of Genius Hour came from one of the most innovative companies–Google, so let’s first take a look at what they do with it (they call it 20% Project):

Please also check out how the concept works in the classroom:

The Genius Hour exists for another reason. According to the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), we try to provide multiple means of engagement. This is why we want the Genius Hour to be yours, and not simply what the instructors assign you to do. Similar ideas may have already appeared in your other classes. Think about the differences they make to your learning experience.

What to do now

Explore ideas that interest you, that you’ve always wanted to try out. Google wants its employees to explore ideas that potentially benefit the company; in the same spirit, I’m asking you to explore ideas that potentially offer educational value (to you or to other people). There are no other limitations.

We will spend some time brainstorming ideas next week. For now, toy with your curiosity as much as possible.

Preparing for next week

Right now it’s actually the craziest time for your EDIT 2000 this semester. We have three projects going on at the same time. To keep track of them, here’s a quick look at what you need to do for the coming weeks:

  1. Citizen Scientist
    • Continue to participate
    • Present to the class on Jan. 26
  2. StoryCorps
    • Interview someone by Jan. 26
    • Design learning activities based on StoryCorps-like interviews on Jan. 26 or Jan. 31, depending on the time we have (group work)
    • Share your activities on Feb. 2
  3. Genius Hour
    • Generate ideas for a project you love to do personally
    • Confirm the idea with me by Jan. 26
    • Write your first Genius Hour blog post and post it to your WordPress by Jan. 31

Also, we do not meet Tuesday, Jan. 24. Instead, use the time to conduct interviews and prepare Citizen Scientist presentations.

Day 04 Universal design for learning (UDL)

In today’s pre-class video, I present to you a real batman–Daniel Kish


Activity design based on meaningful learning concepts

To recall what you read for our reading on meaningful learning, meaningful learning is defined by the 5 following characteristics:

  • Active
  • Constructive
  • Cooperative
  • Authentic
  • Intentional

We did two rounds of discussions. In the second round,

the 5 groups break up to form 4 new groups, so that each of the new groups will have five members each being an “expert” about one concept.

  • Create a simple outline of an instructional activity. Try to incorporate at least 3 of the concepts. Explain why they are relevant, and also why some of the concepts (if any) are missing in your teaching plan.
  • Share your teaching plan and discussion results with the class using Google Doc. Post the shareable link here.
  • Explain your teaching plan to the class. Others please write comments for the presenting group.

So we’ll start today’s class by sharing the activity plans we created last week. We start from the last group in here.

Teaching from technology vs. teaching with technology

What do you think the differences are? (You can find some discussions on this topic from pp.6-7 in our reading.)

We probably won’t have enough time to watch this in class: Sal Khan’s TED talk on the Khan Academy. Do you see teaching “from” technology? Or “with” technology?

Introducing UDL (Universal Design for Learning)

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(image from reddit)

Let’s watch a video introduction to UDL from none other than the pioneer of UDL himself–David Rose.

The 3 key principles of UDL:

  • Provide multiple means of representation
  • Provide multiple means of action and expression
  • Provide multiple means of engagement

Activity: Standing in other people’s shoes (Or seeing from other people’s eyes)

So learners are different. But how do you understand these differences? Here’s an activity for you to experience just that:

Suppose we are designers for an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). It can move in 6 directions according to the command of the operator. The only problem: The vision of the operator is limited to the video feed from the camera attached to the ROV.

For this activity we need two volunteers: One to play the ROV with a camera, the other the operator who can only send verbal command. The operator should face away from the ROV so the video feed will be his/her only source of information. Since it is possible for the “ROV” to run into obstacles (tables in this room), my priority is always your safety.

Other people can either observe the video feed or the ROV in action. But please don’t comment or interrupt the communication between the operator and the ROV.

(This example is adapted from Chapter 10 of Design Interactions)

* For this activity I used an IP Webcam app on my phone to connect to the Ivideon server. If you want to know how to do it, check it out here: https://www.ivideon.com/get/. I believe you can do the same very easily with GoPro or similar camera devices.

Multiple means of representation

Sometimes students fail not because they cannot understand a certain concept, but because they cannot understand a certain representation of the said concept. (Sounds complicated? Maybe my representation of this idea isn’t the best!)

Math problems in foreign languages

Sometimes language gets in the way of learning. This is an excerpt from a short movie showing us the experience of a young boy who is “immersed” in the a school environment where the language of instruction is English, a language he barely knows.

Now let’s try this ourselves.

The following is a math challenge for elementary school students:

330Yen
Click image to enlarge. (source)

You do see some numbers. And maybe Google Translate can help. (It really can!)

Now consider your own experience. Share in this Padlet what you think should be represented in at least one more way in education (but has not been). For example, I find some of the reading assignments for my doctoral study to be rather convoluted, and think that maybe a concept map can help clarify the ideas. (For this exercise, you yourselves don’t need to specify the alternative representation.)

Once you are done, take a look at what your classmates wrote, and try to provide some ideas about the alternative representation. I’d like each of you to make at least one comment.

Multiple means of action & expression

Read the following Twitter novel:

“It’s a miracle he survived,” said the doctor. “It was God’s will,” said Mrs Schicklgruber. “What will you call him?” “Adolf,” she replied.–Jeffrey Archer (originality somewhat disputed)

If our purpose is to teach students about composition, there is little reason why we should ask students to write their story in this particular format. Not all students like this format to begin with. What other means of expression can you think of? For example. I’d probably write a poem.

Now let’s give this principle a try. We will use Common Core standards as examples. In four groups, try to think of at least one non-standardized-testing way to let students express their knowledge about or skills in a certain standard. The standard we will work on is this:

Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. (CCSS.Math.Content.5.MD.C.3)

Write down your ideas here: https://padlet.com/leh858/f33pfoeq3x0j

Multiple means of engagement

We have done enough posting today, so for this UDL concept, we will fall back to traditional group discussion:

  • Are there things more exciting than learning (at school)?
  • Do you learn anything from these exciting activities (I assume these are activities…)? (And I’m not saying learning cannot be your most exciting activity…)
  • Can we transplant some features of these exciting activities to learning (at school)?

We share our ideas in class after 5 minutes.

You may want to look into this concept called “gamification.” Here is an example.

Preparing for Thursday

  • Review meaningful learning and UDL concepts. We will make use of these concepts in our next project: Student Voice.
  • I think I have almost all of you, but if you haven’t, tell me what your choice of Citizen Scientist project is in this Google doc.
  • As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

Day 03 Meaningful learning

Here’s a kindergarten in Japan that may make you think again about education:


Student survey results

Most of you said “learning technology” or something similar, and some of you added specifically that you wanted to learn technology regarding websites, editing, teaching, etc.

More than half of you chose “connecting technology with learners” and “use technology to boost personal productivity” for goals.

It looks like most of you are good at using office software.

Setting up remind

Follow this link to set up your Remind account: https://www.remind.com/join/cek26a

Remind allows me to text you (without knowing your phone number) important class updates. Usually I will only text you when I have to cancel classes.

Citizen Scientists

Sharing ideas

We will use Padlet to share information about citizen scientist projects we find interesting. You can access it here: https://padlet.com/leh858/p8djfewzyo2e

Padlet is an online post-it board that allows a group of people to simultaneously write down and share their ideas. It can help when it is too time consuming to let everyone speak, or when someone prefers writing to talking. We can, of course, talk about our ideas when the posts are up.

For this activity I want you to post the citizen scientist project you have chosen for this class. In addition, you can also post projects that you find really interesting, but for various reasons have decided not to participate in this semester. Your classmates may find such information useful.

Here are a few videos about citizen scientists:

  1. Let’s hear from citizen scientists themselves on their experience with nature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rrZUg0epY4
  2. Young people, old people–it doesn’t matter! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgdr2wkVhWk
  3. Not just about nature. There’s something for bookworms too! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pX514ma6KoA
  4. And not just things. Citizen Scientists can create an impact on society as well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZKxn1nioNA

Your interest comes first

One idea that I push very hard in this class is that your learning needs matter, greatly. I choose citizen scientist to be our first project because it allows quite some freedom for you to choose what you want to do. (It’s amazing that given technology we are able to do this!)

In groups, talk about what was the last project (as long as it qualifies for you) you did simply because you were interested? Did you learn anything from it? What was it?

Confirmation

Please register your choice of citizen scientist project with me in this Google doc.

Usually I use the order of registration to decide the order of presentation. The later you sign up, the early you present on the presentation day. However, if you register early and wish to present early, you are welcome to do so.

Meaningful learning

Since you’ve read our first reading, you must be familiar with these concepts:

  • Active
  • Constructive
  • Cooperative
  • Authentic
  • Intentional

EDIT 2000 is about technology and learning, and we’ll start our discussion from “learning,” since otherwise what would technology do?

Before we move on to the discussion, I would like to know:

  1. Do you have questions about any of these concepts? (I expect questions!)
  2. Do you know how to share a Google doc? (You’ll need to share a Google doc for the discussion.)

We will have two rounds of group discussion about these concepts:

  • In the first round, please break into 5 groups, each group discussing the understanding of one concept. Trying to think of examples demonstrating what this concept is and is not about. This round lasts up to 7 minutes.
  • In the second round, the 5 groups break up to form 4 new groups, so that each of the new groups will have five members each being an “expert” about one concept.
    • Create a simple outline of an instructional activity. Try to incorporate at least 3 of the concepts. Explain why they are relevant, and also why some of the concepts (if any) are missing in your teaching plan.
    • Share your teaching plan and discussion results with the class using Google Doc. Post the shareable link here.
    • Explain your teaching plan to the class. Others please write comments for the presenting group.

Teaching from technology vs. teaching with technology

What do you think the differences are? (You can find some discussions on this topic from pp.6-7 in our reading.)

We probably won’t have enough time to watch this in class: Sal Khan’s TED talk on the Khan Academy. Do you see teaching “from” technology? Or “with” technology?

Bonus

What is WOW to you? If it’s not an interjection, it is probably the World of Warcraft. (It’s pretty old, I know.) I’ll leave the judgment to you whether it’s a good game or not. The question is: Can you use it for educational purposes?

Preparing for next week

  • Read about Universal Design for Learning (UDL) here. We will start our discussion about UDL on Wednesday.
  • Complete this survey so I know where to look for your tweets and blogs.
  • As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

Day 02 A taste of EDIT 2000

Today it’s an audio recording instead of a video clip. (Too bad I cannot embed this recording in a WordPress.com blog post like I can with a YouTube video.)
https://storycorps.org/listen/brian-miller-and-his-son-johnathan-emerson/

Student information survey

I don’t have all of you yet! Please fill out this student survey before our class Thursday (completion of which qualifies you for a late pass–guess what you can do with it?).

How many classmates do you remember?

Play a game to refresh your memory! Join the game at Kahoot.it.

Activity stations

We will break into 4 groups, each group working on one “activity station.” We rotate every 15 minutes, so hopefully we shall be able to experience all 4 activities today.

  1. Twitter
  2. Citizen Scientists
  3. Little Bits
  4. Critical Thinking

Preparing for Thursday

  • Complete this survey so I know where to look for your tweets and blogs.
  • Do keep looking for Citizen Scientist projects to participate in. I will ask you for your choice on Thursday. I encourage you to explore your own interest. For this project there’s no need to do group work just for the sake of group work.
  • If you haven’t already, read pp.2-8 from Howland, J., & Jonassen, D. (2012). Meaningful learning with technology (4th ed.). Boston: Pearson. (Go to https://www.pearsonhighered.com/program/Howland-Meaningful-Learning-with-Technology-4th-Edition/PGM18166.html and choose Sample Chapter). We will be discussing the reading in class on Thursday.
  • Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.