Day 09 UDL, StoryCorps, & Genius Hour

UDL

Multiple means of engagement

What is your most favorite game (in the real world or virtual)? Post a picture to Padlet and write a few keywords explaining why it is engaging.

You may want to look into this concept called “gamification.” Here is an example.

Citizen Scientist

If you haven’t created the post yet, let’s go to your WordPress, log in, and create a “post.” Name it “Citizen Scientist midway report” or something similar.

In one paragraph (you can write more), tell me where you are with your project and how you feel about it so far.

StoryCorps

The project description can be found here or from the menu.

Here’s a video tutorial on how to use StoryCorps.

Proposed project timeline:

  1. By Sep. 7, finish your interview.
  2. On Sep. 7, get ready to discuss StoryCorps-based teaching plan ideas (in groups of 3).
  3. On Sep. 12, share your teaching plan with the rest of the class.

Genius Hour

The Genius Hour project is a semester-long project that helps you and allows you to think meaningfully and take action about personal interests that may offer (educational) value.

The idea of Genius Hour came from one of the most innovative companies–Google, so let’s first take a look at what they do with it (they call it 20% Project):

Please also check out how the concept works in the classroom:

The Genius Hour exists for another reason. According to the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), we try to provide multiple means of engagement. This is why we want the Genius Hour to be yours, and not simply what the instructors assign you to do. Similar ideas may have already appeared in your other classes. Think about the differences they make to your learning experience.

What to do now

Explore ideas that interest you, that you’ve always wanted to try out. Google wants its employees to explore ideas that potentially benefit the company; in the same spirit, I’m asking you to explore ideas that potentially offer educational value (to you or to other people). There are no other limitations.

We will spend some time brainstorming ideas next week. For now, toy with your curiosity as much as possible.

Preparing for next week

  1. Well, we don’t meet on Friday. Please use the time to conduct your StoryCorps interview.
  2. We don’t meet on Monday, either.
  3. Remember to upload your interview and tell me how to find it by 11:59pm, Sep. 7.
  4. Start planning your Citizen Scientist presentation according to the project description. Make it 3-4 minutes long (no need to be exact). I’ll explain how we do the presentation when we come back.
  5. To recapitulate, we have 3 projects going on at this moment:
    1. Citizen Scientist: going into the final stage;
    2. StoryCorps: a quick project that has just started;
    3. Genius Hour: a semester-long project that has not exactly started yet.
  6. As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.
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Day 08 UDL

Citizen Scientist

I don’t have a record of some of your projects of choice. Please see the end of today’s post for detail.

Khan Academy reflections

I left some comments for everyone who posted. I’d be glad to continue the conversation if you are interested. Email me!

Revisiting our remote-control activity & UDL

There is no such thing as an average learner. This is why UDL (Universal Design for Learning) exists.

What was your experience:

  • Sending our verbal commands?
  • Executing verbal commands without vision?
  • Watching your classmates fumble for the buzzer?

What implications do you see from this activity for “There’s no average learner?”

I hope you have had time to watch this video introduction to UDL. If you haven’t yet, please find some time to do so.

The 3 key principles of UDL:

  • Provide multiple means of representation
  • Provide multiple means of action and expression
  • Provide multiple means of engagement

Multiple means of representation

Sometimes students fail not because they cannot understand a certain concept, but because they cannot understand a certain representation of the said concept. (Sounds complicated? Maybe my representation of this idea isn’t the best!)

Math problems in foreign languages

Sometimes language gets in the way of learning. This is an excerpt from a short movie showing us the experience of a young boy who is “immersed” in the a school environment where the language of instruction is English, a language he barely knows.

Now let’s try this ourselves.

The following is a math challenge for elementary school students:

330Yen
Click to enlarge. (source)

You do see some numbers. And maybe Google Translate can help (?)

Now consider your own experience. Share in this Google Doc what you think should be represented in at least one more way in education (but has not been). For example, I find some of the reading assignments for my doctoral study to be rather convoluted, and think that maybe a concept map can help clarify the ideas. (For this exercise, you yourselves don’t need to specify the alternative representation.)

Once you are done, take a look at what your classmates wrote, and try to provide some ideas about the alternative representation. I’d like each of you to make at least one comment.

Multiple means of action & expression

Read the following Twitter novel:

“It’s a miracle he survived,” said the doctor. “It was God’s will,” said Mrs Schicklgruber. “What will you call him?” “Adolf,” she replied.–Jeffrey Archer (originality somewhat disputed)

If our purpose is to teach students about composition, there is little reason why we should ask students to write their story in this particular format. Not all students like this format to begin with. What other means of expression can you think of? For example. I’d probably write a poem.

Now let’s give this principle a try. We will use Common Core standards as examples. In four groups, try to think of as many ways to let students express their knowledge about or skills in a certain standard as possible. Each group will then share one idea to the class in succession. We can do this for multiple rounds until we are satisfied with our understanding of this UDL concept of multiple means of expression.

To spice things up, I would like to add a few late passes as rewards to the activity. If we share for three rounds without any one group failing to share a unique and reasonable idea, we all get a late pass; if one of the groups fail to share a unique or reasonable idea within 15 seconds after their turn starts, the group which successfully shares the last idea will get a late pass. Whether the idea is unique/reasonable or not ultimately depends on your instructor’s judgment. This is meant to be a friendly competition. If you do not like this idea, tell me (by email) and we can do this activity perfectly fine without the late passes.

For simulation, we will try using this core standard for one round:

Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.5.9)

And we’ll use this for the actual activity for up to three rounds:

Recognize volume as an attribute of solid figures and understand concepts of volume measurement. (CCSS.Math.Content.5.MD.C.3)

Multiple means of engagement

What is your most favorite game (in the real world or virtual)? Post a picture to Padlet and write a few keywords explaining why it is engaging.

You may want to look into this concept called “gamification.” Here is an example.

Introduction to StoryCorps

StoryCorps is about interviewing people. StoryCorps also provides the technology for one to easily interview people and then upload the interview to be archived forever.

In EDIT 2000 we use StoryCorps as a piece of technology to listen to people’s small “t” version of truth. Remember? There is no “average student.”

StoryCorps is our next project. I will talk about the details on Wednesday. For now, please watch this video introduction to StoryCorps, and listen to at least two interviews on their website. Come to class on Wednesday prepared to share what impress you and what you find wanting.

Preparing for Wednesday

  1. Get to know StoryCorps.
  2. Post your Citizen Scientist midway report to your WordPress using the “post” format by 11:59 pm, Aug. 31. If you need technical support, you can write the content first, and ask me about WordPress in class on Wednesday. (Citizen Scientist project description)
    • Brittany, Zach, Michael, Megan, Ryan, and Allen: Either by my mistake or yours, I don’t have a record of your project of choice. Let me know at the end of class.
  3. As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

Day 07 Teaching with technology & UDL

We had a great time sharing lesson plans last time, and I appreciate the feedback you gave each other. It was a very good start! Next time we’ll try to further the discussion by giving responses to the feedback we receive.

Meaningful learning

Games and education

What is WOW to you? If it’s not an interjection, it is probably the World of Warcraft. I’ll leave the judgment to you whether it’s a good game or not. The question is: Can you use it for educational purposes?

Teaching from technology vs. teaching with technology

Teaching from technology and teaching with technology–What do you think the differences are? (You can find some discussions on this topic from pp.6-7 in our reading.)

Despite the difference being just one word, this distinction between “from” and “with” is quite profound for our profession (educational technology). So let’s pause here and reflect a little on how technology has been used in your education so far. In groups of 3, write down any instances of technology integration in your education in this Google doc. When you are done, take a look at what other groups have written, and use the “fill” tool to indicate any experiences that you also had. We’ll do this for about 5 minutes.

fill


Let’s watch this very inspirational talk by Sal Khan on his Khan Academy. It’s a 16-minute talk, but it’s worth your every minute (and then Bill Gates interviewed him, which you can watch on your free time). Do you see Sal Khan transitioning from teaching from technology to teaching with technology?

Depending on the time we have: please write down anything that impresses you during the talk on this Padlet wall. Use your name as the title of the post.

Introducing UDL (Universal Design for Learning)

ilrpff4
(image from reddit)

Let’s watch a video introduction to UDL from none other than the pioneer of UDL himself–David Rose.

The 3 key principles of UDL:

  • Provide multiple means of representation
  • Provide multiple means of action and expression
  • Provide multiple means of engagement

Activity: Standing in other people’s shoes (Or seeing from other people’s eyes)

So learners are different. But how do you understand these differences? Here’s an activity for you to experience just that:

Suppose we are designers for an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). It can move in 6 directions according to the command of the operator. The only problem: The vision of the operator is limited to the video feed from the camera attached to the ROV.

For this activity we need two volunteers: One to play the ROV with a camera, the other the operator who can only send verbal command. The operator should face away from the ROV so the video feed will be his/her only source of information. Since it is possible for the “ROV” to run into obstacles (tables in this room), my priority is always your safety.

Other people can either observe the video feed or the ROV in action. But please don’t comment or interrupt the communication between the operator and the ROV.

(This example is adapted from Chapter 10 of Design Interactions)

Preparing for Monday

  • Read about Universal Design for Learning (UDL) here if you haven’t yet.
  • Confirm your Citizen Scientist project with me if you haven’t. Start participating in the Citizen Scientist project of your choice.
  • Tweet.
  • As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

Day 06 Meaningful learning & UDL

Meaningful learning

We didn’t have time to finish the 2nd round of discussion, so we’ll do it today.

Let’s review the core concepts:

  • Active
  • Constructive
  • Cooperative
  • Authentic
  • Intentional

While it’s not exactly easy to incorporate all meaningful learning characteristics in one lesson, it’s not hard to avoid all of them–Here’s an example (I’m showing this commercial to demonstrate a learning experience, not to advertise for the company making the commercial). See if you can find any of the meaningful learning characteristics (I can’t!)


Now take out the colored sticky notes you got from me on Monday, and form groups with people who have the same color as you do.

so that each of the new groups will have five members each being an “expert” about one concept.

  • Create a simple outline of a teaching plan. Try to incorporate at least 3 of the concepts. Explain why they are relevant, and also why some of the concepts (if any) are missing in your teaching plan.
  • Share your teaching plan and discussion results with the class using Google Doc. Post the shareable link here.
  • Explain your teaching plan to the class. Others please write comments for the presenting group.

Meaningful learning–Games and education

What is WOW to you? If it’s not an interjection, it is probably the World of Warcraft. I’ll leave the judgment to you whether it’s a good game or not. The question is: Can you use it for educational purposes?

Teaching from technology vs. teaching with technology

We didn’t do this on Monday, and we shall have time for it today.

Teaching from technology and teaching with technology–What do you think the differences are? (You can find some discussions on this topic from pp.6-7 in our reading.)

Let’s watch this very inspirational talk by Sal Khan on his Khan Academy. Do you see teaching “from” technology? Or “with” technology?

Citizen Scientist

Please confirm your Citizen Scientist project of choice with me. Once it is confirmed, this is what you need to do and a tentative timeline for the tasks:

  1. Start participating ASAP;
  2. Write a one-paragraph “post” on your WordPress blog as your midway report by Wednesday, Aug. 31; (My aim is also for you to try out the “post” feature if you haven’t used it before.)
  3. Tweet about your participation at least 5 times before presentation (and remember to use #edit2000 if there’s room for it);
  4. Present to the class about your experience on Friday, Sep. 9. Email a link or a copy of your presentation before class.

Here’s a simple rubric:

  • Tweet at least 5 tweets as you progress through the project–25%
  • Tweet at least one picture of your participation (can be one of the 5 tweets)–5%
  • Tweet at least a thought of the project (can be one of the 5 tweets)–5%
  • Screenshot of your tweets included in the poster/slides-5%
  • Poster/slides created to demonstrate meaningful learning–30%
  • Poster/slides linked to portfolio–10%
  • Poster/slides sharing in class–20%

For the presentation, address the following questions, and add anything that you find valuable in your participation:

  • What is your project about?
  • Do you see any of the 5 characteristics of meaningful learning in your participation experience? Please explain.
  • Do you recommend it for K-12 at all? Which grade level do you recommend it for?
    • If yes–
      • List predicted learning outcomes
      • List some keywords of its best features
    • If no–
      • List obstacles to desired learning outcomes
      • List keywords on potential improvements

Introducing UDL (Universal Design for Learning)

ilrpff4
(image from reddit)

Let’s watch a video introduction to UDL from none other than the pioneer of UDL himself–David Rose.

The 3 key principles of UDL:

  • Provide multiple means of representation
  • Provide multiple means of action and expression
  • Provide multiple means of engagement

Preparing for Friday

  • Read about Universal Design for Learning (UDL) here if you haven’t yet.
  • Start participating in the Citizen Scientist project of your choice.
  • Tweet.
  • As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

Day 05 Meaningful Learning

Today we will discuss our first reading on Meaningful Learning! We are reaching the core of the class really fast!

Before the discussion, we need to take care of a few things.

Your names, please

Please bring your name plates with you for a few more sessions. Thank you!

The late pass

I counted 18 responses in our student information survey, which qualified 18 students for one late pass. If you didn’t get yours, there will still more other chances later on. You can use your late pass to cancel out one absence or to delay submission of work by one day–although my hope is that you never use them.

Twitter & WordPress

If you haven’t yet, please tell me your Twitter handle and WordPress address here. I counted 16 accounts each last time I checked.

Please tweet regularly. I suggest you tweet at least once every time we have class.

Some of you have set up your Twitter account to be protected. If that’s the case, please “allow” me to follow you. Ideally you should remove that protection all together. We are tweeting professionally for our class, and your professional image should be open. I realize that I’ve restricted the definition of “professional” a little too much, so let’s do it again:

Professional in this EDIT 2000 section means it’s related to education, technology, or your major.

Remind

Again, I counted 16 participants. I highly recommend you register. See our course content for Day 04 for instructions.

Citizen Scientists story-sharing

We started the discussion about Citizen Scientists last week, but we didn’t have time to finish it.

These were the videos we watched:

  1. Let’s hear from citizen scientists themselves on their experience with nature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rrZUg0epY4
  2. Young people, old people–it doesn’t matter! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgdr2wkVhWk
  3. Not just about nature. There’s something for bookworms too! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pX514ma6KoA
  4. And not just things. Citizen Scientists can create an impact on society as well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZKxn1nioNA

Here’s our discussion on Padlet, and here are the guiding questions:

  • In what ways can these projects be interesting? And interesting to what kind of people?
  • In what ways do such citizen scientists acquire knowledge? And contribute to knowledge acquisition?
  • When was the last time that you did something out of personal interest (alone)? Did you learn anything form it? (Please share at least one story to the class.)

In your original groups, please spend up to 5 minutes to finish the discussion, so we can then share your thoughts with the class.

Meaningful learning

Since you’ve read our first reading, you must be familiar with these concepts:

  • Active
  • Constructive
  • Cooperative
  • Authentic
  • Intentional

EDIT 2000 is about technology and learning, and we’ll start our discussion from “learning,” since otherwise what would technology do? Before we move on to the discussion:

  1. Do you have questions about any of these concepts?
  2. Do you know how to share a Google Doc?

We will have two rounds of group discussion about these concepts:

  • In the first round, please break into 5 groups, each group discussing the understanding of one concept. Trying to think of examples demonstrating what this concept is and is not about. This round lasts up to 7 minutes.
  • In the second round, the 5 groups break up to form 4 new groups, so that each of the new groups will have five members each being an “expert” about one concept.
    • Create a simple outline of a teaching plan. Try to incorporate at least 3 of the concepts. Explain why they are relevant, and also why some of the concepts (if any) are missing in your teaching plan.
    • Share your teaching plan and discussion results with the class using Google Doc. Post the shareable link here.
    • Explain your teaching plan to the class. Others please write comments for the presenting group.

Teaching from technology vs. teaching with technology

What do you think the differences are? (You can find some discussions on this topic from pp.6-7 in our reading.)

We probably won’t have enough time to watch this in class: Sal Khan’s TED talk on the Khan Academy. Do you see teaching “from” technology? Or “with” technology?

Bonus

What is WOW to you? If it’s not an interjection, it is probably the World of Warcraft. I’ll leave the judgment to you whether it’s a good game or not. The question is: Can you use it for educational purposes?

Preparing for Wednesday

 

  • Read about Universal Design for Learning (UDL) here. We will start our discussion about UDL on Wednesday.
  • Continue to explore Citizen Scientists projects. You will need to confirm with me and then commit to one project on Wednesday.
  • As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

 

Day 04 Setting up your accounts & Citizen Scientists

We have quite a bit to cover today.

Getting to know you(r names)

Please make name plates for yourselves. I will need you to bring them for a few weeks, so make them pretty!

Survey results

Thanks for filling out the survey! Here are the results:

Your expectations

  • Learning how to use technology
  • Learning how to teach with technology
  • Learning a specific skill (e.g., building a website)
  • Meaningful projects

Learning objectives

initial survey item 4

Top 3:

  1. Use technology to boost personal productivity
  2. Create learning activities with the help of technology
  3. Connect technology with learner needs

Your tech skills

  • accounting software
  • film editing
  • social media
  • MS Office
  • typing

Setting up Remind

Follow this link to set up your Remind account: https://www.remind.com/join/gc678a

Remind allows me to text you (without knowing your phone number) important class updates. Usually I will only text you when I have to cancel classes.

Twitter

I hope through two sessions of “experiencing EDIT 2000” you have already set up your Twitter account for EDIT 2000. If you have experienced problems setting up the account, please let me know and I’ll try my best to help you.

WordPress and your portfolio

In this section of EDIT 2000 I prefer WordPress as the platform for your portfolio. Still, you are free to choose other platforms such as Weebly, WIX, or any other service that you are familiar with.

Today in class I will walk you through the creation of a WordPress portfolio. Again, you are free to ignore my instructions if you wish to try another platform. Just let me know!

Register your accounts with me

I will need to know your accounts for me to grade your work, so please let me know your WordPress address and Twitter handle by filling in this Google form.

Citizen Scientists

What are they? How do they relate to education and technology? We will together watch the first video, and break into 4 groups, each watching one of the next 4.

How technology is connected to (or connects) citizen scientists: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81hhecI0p5k

  1. Let’s hear from citizen scientists themselves on their experience with nature: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rrZUg0epY4
  2. Young people, old people–it doesn’t matter! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bgdr2wkVhWk
  3. Not just about nature. There’s something for bookworms too! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pX514ma6KoA
  4. And not just things. Citizen Scientists can create an impact on society as well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZKxn1nioNA

Ask yourselves these questions:

  • In what ways can these projects be interesting? And interesting to what kind of people?
  • In what ways do such citizen scientists acquire knowledge? And contribute to knowledge acquisition?
  • When was the last time that you did something out of personal interest (alone)? Did you learn anything form it? (Please share at least one story to the class.)

Write down your thoughts as groups here, on a Padlet wall (PW: 1220). Padlet is a wonderful piece of technology that we are going to use over and over again this semester.

Super-early preparation for our final project

Our final project is about BYOD/1:1, which, in words that common people understand,  is about technology integration into education. We won’t go into details about the project now. The reason why this section is even here is that we will be contacting your previous schools and ask them about their technology integration experience. For this purpose, if you can get into touch with at least one of your grade school teachers, it will help with your final project greatly.

Preparation for next week

  1. If you haven’t already, please finish the student information survey here by end of today to qualify for a late pass.
  2. Read pp.2-8 from Howland, J., & Jonassen, D. (2012). Meaningful learning with technology (4th ed.). Boston: Pearson. (Go to https://www.pearsonhighered.com/program/Howland-Meaningful-Learning-with-Technology-4th-Edition/PGM18166.html and choose Sample Chapter) by Monday, Aug. 22, before class. We will be discussing the reading in class.
  3. Explore more Citizen Scientists projects, and be ready to commit and start participating by Wednesday.
  4. Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.

Day 03

Today we will be doing the same things we did on Monday, just that the groups who did Tasks 1 & 2 will be doing Tasks 3 & 4, and vice versa.

For your convenience:

Preparing for Friday

  1. Most of you have completed the student survey, but if you haven’t, please do so here (completion of which qualifies you for a late pass).
  2. Read pp.2-8 from Howland, J., & Jonassen, D. (2012). Meaningful learning with technology (4th ed.). Boston: Pearson. (Go to https://www.pearsonhighered.com/program/Howland-Meaningful-Learning-with-Technology-4th-Edition/PGM18166.html and choose Sample Chapter) by the coming Monday, Aug. 22, before class. We will be discussing the reading in class.
  3. Do take a closer look at Citizen Scientist projects. We will talk about participation on Friday, and you’ll need to commit and start participating by next Wednesday.
  4. Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.