IMPORTANT: Room change on Wednesday

We will move to a different classroom on Wednesday, Mar. 2, 2016 (just this one day).

  • The 10:10 section will go to 0306 Aderhold;
  • The 11:15 section will go to 0626 Aderhold.

Please remind your group mates about this. Thanks!

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Days 18-20

The following are what we will be discussing in class for the remaining 3 rounds of discussion.

Friday, Feb. 26

What are the possible resources your students can use? What are the possible activities your students can do?

Agenda:

  • How’s the group work going?
  • Please briefly summarize your group’s takeaway from Wednesday.
  • What are the possible resources for your students to use? Let’s brainstorm for them!
  • Now let’s brainstorm for activities that you can possibly use to get your students to research on the topic/keep engaged in the topic/do whatever you think is beneficial.
  • Where do you predict your students will find potential conflicts in the information they find? (e.g., book vs. interview, or experiments under different conditions.)
  • Any other questions you may have.

Monday, Feb. 29

How can your students evaluate possible conflicting information, or the trustworthiness of a particular source?

Agenda:

  • How’s the group work going?
  • Please briefly summarize your group’s takeaway from Friday.
  • What is your anticipation of your students’ reaction to conflicting information?
    • What do you do when you observe that some students are very entrenched in one perspective?
    • What do you plan to do when your students don’t agree with each other?
  • What are the ways such conflicts can be resolved? Is there a best way? Or do you have a list of recommendations?
  • Any other questions you may have.

Wednesday, Mar. 2

Present your answers in the form of an improved version of the wonder of your choice. (You decide how it looks.)

Agenda:

  • How’s the group work going so far?
  • Please show your classmates the work your groups have done so far.
  • Let’s brainstorm for possible ways to present your project:
    • pen & paper/brick & mortar?
    • slideshow?
    • annotated Wonderopolis?
    • web page?
    • something else?
  • What are the most important aspect of your projects? These should stand out in your presentation.
  • Do you need any technical support? Your classmates may be able to help. And I’ll definitely try to help you.
  • Any other questions you may have.

Also, have you received the link to Mutlu’s survey? It’s here. It should take less than 5 minutes, and it will help people better understand the impact of technology on education. Your help is greatly appreciated!

Day 17 Critical thinking: 1st discussion

Please DO remember to sent at least one member of your group to class.

Our agenda for the day:

  • Sharing progress:
    • What wonder have you chosen?
    • How do group members communicate?
    • How do you collaborate/cooperate?
  • Who are your hypothetical students? What are their defining characteristics?
  • What does “critical thinking” mean to you?
  • What difficulties do you anticipate in getting your students to think critically? What do you plan to do if they don’t seem to think critically?
  • And any other questions you may have.

Also, have you received the link to Mutlu’s survey? It’s here. It should take less than 5 minutes, and it will help people better understand the impact of technology on education. Your help is greatly appreciated!

 

Day 16

20160222

our progress as of Feb. 22

Meaningful Learning presentation/exhibition

We will do an exhibition kind of presentation. Here’s how we are going to do it:

  1. Please upload your visual notes to Padlet: 10:10 section or 11:15 section. Use your name as title and upload the image as content.
  2. According to this table:
    Meaningful Learning grouping
    The columns represent the stations, and the rows the rounds. For example, Justin will go to the red station in the 1st round.
  3. Each round lasts about 5 minutes. When it’s your turn at the station, scroll to your visual notes, and get ready to present to your classmates.
  4. If it’s not your turn, please go around the classroom and check out the work of your classmates. Take some notes.
  5. Form two-member groups, write down some of the ideas that you have about the visual notes (10:10 section here, and 11:15 section here). It’s OK to be critical. Your comments will not be used for grading purposes.

Wonderopolis: The critical thinking project

Back on Day 04 I asked you to read our first reading:Goal of Technology Integrations: Meaningful Learning. I didn’t ask you to read past p.9, but on p.10 you’ll find ISTE’s National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making, and this project is based on these four standards:

ISTE critical thinking

Now introducing Wonderopolis. Take a look and tell me what you think it is.

For this project:

  • Get into groups of 4. Send me an email (to lh81655@uga.edu) and tell me who your group members are before the end of the day.
  • Find a wonder (on Wonderopolis, of course) that interest you–and assuming that your hypothetical students are interested in this topic as well, consider:
    1. How do you challenge your students to think critically about the information provided by Wonderopolis? What questions are you going to ask? (How do you define critical thinking?)
    2. What are the possible resources your students can use? What are the possible activities your students can do?
    3. How can your students evaluate possible conflicting information, or the trustworthiness of a particular source?
  • What is you answer to the questions above (and any questions that you think are relevant to the NETS on critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making)? Present your answers in the form of an improved version of the wonder of your choice. (You decide how it looks.)

Since this is a group project, you may want to find ways to collaborate or cooperate. For the following 5 class sessions:

  • Wednesday, Feb. 24: discussion about the 1st question
  • Friday, Feb. 26: discussion about the 2nd question
  • Monday, Feb. 29: discussion about the 3rd question
  • Wednesday, Mar. 2: discussion about the form of presentation
  • Friday, Mar. 4: group work (you decide whether you want to come to class or not)

For each of the 4 discussion sessions, I only need one person to come to class to represent your group (and I don’t mind if it’s the same person or 4 different people). This representative should then communicate with the group, so the next representative will know what has been discussed in previous sessions.

Make sure you send at least one person for each discussion, else it’s 10% off for each discussion missed.

And on Mar. 14, when we come back from Spring Break, we will present our projects.

Genius Hour

Your 2nd Genius Hour post is scheduled for this Friday, Feb. 26. Does it work? It would be OK with me to push it to Monday, Feb. 29, if you need the weekend to work on it.

Preparing for Wednesday

  1. Group up! (And tell me!) And make sure you can reach each other in the group in some way.
  2. Decide on how to collaborate/cooperate. Setting up a shared Google doc is a good idea.
  3. The representatives for Wednesday’s discussion should be very familiar with the 1st question, although you really should be thinking about the questions together. You do NOT need to come to class with complete answers. We will discuss, and share ideas.
  4. As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

 

Quick reminder: What to prepare for Monday

  1. You do not have to come to class on Friday.
  2. I will still be in the classroom for questions.
  3. Choose one of the two options: (for details, see Day 13)
    1. For the StoryCorps option, think about the details for just one way to use it.
    2. For the class resources option, pick one Citizen Scientists project, and think about the reasons why/scenarios when teachers will use a tag. Do this for at least 5 tags.
  4. Make a visual representation of your ideas for the option you’ve chosen, using Coggle, Piktochart, or other tools:
    1. here’s a master list of apps you can use for this purpose (this page also provides nice advice if you think you are not enough an artist to create visualizations);
    2. here’s a video playlist reviewing a list of mind mapping tools;
    3. and here’s a list of nice tools for infographics.
  5. You can use our brainstorming results as reference. Look for it in the class resources page. You’ll also find the visual notes we took on Grow Creativity there.
  6. Pay attention to three things:
    1. Make sure that your visualization makes sense.
    2. Make it attractive so people actually want to look at it.
    3. There are no other rules.
  7. Some of you asked me about group work. I’m not against it. I expect the result to speak for itself how a group of people, instead of one person, is needed for the job.
  8. Come to class with your work ready to be shared.

Day 15 Visual notes (continued)

Reminder: We are meeting in 227 Aderhold today.

Please sit with your partner from last class session, as we continue our group work today.

20160217

our progress as of Feb. 17

The project schedule has been updated. If you bookmarked the previous schedule, you need to update the link to: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1B-SSLpFMERCCGIKiO_CNuC22nz–4FAoHdoG0IfBS5Y/pubhtml?gid=1036661771&single=true

Visual note-taking continued

So we are basically going to do what we didn’t finish on Monday. Below is an infograph I made with Piktochart, which supposedly teaches you how to use Piktochart (but, well, I guess I’m not very good at using Piktochart…)

piktochart-howto

While it may not look as good as you’d like it to be, it also took less time than you’d probably imagined.

Learn to use the tools. I won’t judge your work for this task (making a visual note about the Grow Creativity reading). If there’s something that you don’t know how to do, ask your partner, a classmate, or me.

After you are finished with this visual notes task, please try out at least one other tool listed in the previous post (Day 14). Tell me which tool you’ve chosen here (there are two tabs in the spreadsheet; please choose the one for your section).

Preparing for next week

  • We do not meet on Friday. Use the time to create a visual note for your Meaningful Learning mini project. We will share the visual notes in class on Monday, so come prepared.
  • I will still be in class on Friday, just in case you have questions about the project and/or the tools.
  • It will take me sometime to read through all of your blogs. I will try to send you my feedback before we come back to class on Monday.
  • As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.

Day 14 Visual note-taking

20160215.PNG

our progress as of Feb. 15

We are moving on to the creativity and problem solving projects. We will start by taking a look at visual note-taking.

RSA Animate: Changing Education Paradigms

This is an 11-minute video, but it is worth every minute for us to watch in class. So here we go: Sir Ken Robinson’s animated talk on changing education paradigms (and particularly, on creativity)

Write down a few things that impressed you on the Padlet wall (for the 10:10 section, or the 11:15 section).

Does this remind you of a certain UDL principle?

An easy visual note creation task

For this task, please form groups of 2, and spend 20 minutes:

  1. Read Grow Creativity (the article, not the whole issue), and think about how you can represent what you find valuable in this article visually. Discuss between the two of you.
  2. You have the choice of using either Coggle or Piktochart. The former is easier; the latter is more versatile. Create an account, or log in with your Google account.
  3. Use these tools to create a visual representation of important information you find from Grow Creativity. Specifically, consider these things:
    1. What is my takeaway from the reading?
    2. What could be important to people who haven’t read it?
    3. How do I visually represent the importance of the information?
  4. Take a look at your partner’s work–What you can do that he/she cannot with the app? Which app do you like more?
  5. Export your work as an image.
  6. Upload your image to a shared Google folder (10:10 section, 11:15 section). Depending on time, we will either share our work in the class today or on Friday.

Visualize your Meaningful Learning mini project

Now that you have learned something about visual notes, start planning to visualize your Meaningful Learning mini project, whichever option you’ve chosen. You don’t have to use the two apps we just tried:

  1. here’s a master list of apps you can use for this purpose (this page also provides nice advice if you think you are not enough an artist to create visualizations);
  2. here’s a video playlist reviewing a list of mind mapping tools;
  3. and here’s a list of nice tools for infographics.

I personally use yEd and XMind a lot.

Preparing for Wednesday

  1. Try out a few more tools for creating visualizations. You can start creating a visual representation of your Meaningful Learning mini project now with any app (or even pen and paper).
  2. We meet on Wednesday in 227 Aderhold. I will also remind you using Remind. We will continue to work on the apps.
  3. Don’t forget your 1st Genius Hour post!
  4. As always, if you have questions or concerns about this course, talk to me before you leave, or send me an email at lh81655@uga.edu.