Day 07

Who would like to be our Tweeter of the Day today?

Multiple means of presentation

We didn’t finish this last week, so let’s go back to Day 06 and pick up where we left.

Multiple means of expression

This is how the world’s fastest Rubik’s cube solver does his thing. You probably can’t do that, but that doesn’t mean you know nothing about the Rubik’s cube–which in turn, doesn’t mean you want to do it on stage to show off whatever knowledge you have about the cube.

“It’s a miracle he survived,” said the doctor. “It was God’s will,” said Mrs Schicklgruber. “What will you call him?” “Adolf,” she replied.–a Twitter novel by Jeffrey Archer (somewhat disputed)

If our purpose is to teach students about composition, there is little reason why we should ask students to write their story in this particular format. Not all students like this format to begin with. What other means of expression can you think of? For example. I’d probably write a poem.

Now write down a skill or piece of knowledge that you have on a piece of paper. We’ll toss things around a little bit.

Multiple means of engagement?

What is your most favorite game (in the real world or virtual)? Post a picture to Padlet and write a few keywords explaining why it is engaging

You may want to look into this concept called “gamification.” Here is an example.

Reviewing UDL

The 3 key principles of UDL:

  • Provide multiple means of representation
  • Provide multiple means of action and expression
  • Provide multiple means of engagement

Just a reminder of how people can come to understand the world in different ways: Daniel Kish–the human dolphin. Besides, since a lot of you are interested in teaching students with special needs, Daniel Kish should really be an inspirational figure.

An introduction to the Student Voice project (We will do this on Wednesday)

Now that you’ve had time to think about technology’s role in classrooms and how UDL can impact student learning–what is student voice? It’s really more than just giving students a way to communicate–it’s giving them a way to have a say in their learning (sounds kind of like UDL). Choose an article, video, or blog post from this Edutopia page to learn more about Student Voice. Once you’ve read/viewed your choice–Tweet a link to it and one thing you learned about Student Voice from the article. Use #edit2000 in your tweet so we can find it.  Also, follow these people on Twitter who talk about #studentvoice: @plemmonsa  @shannonmmiller if you haven’t done it already. Last, take a few minutes to view what people are tweeting about #studentvoice and #stuvoice (you can simply search the hashtag in Twitter or view it from this hashtag aggregator).

Preparing for Wednesday

  1. Tweet about #studentvoice according to the description above, if you haven’t done it in class. (We will do this on Wednesday)
  2. Work on your Genius Hour ideas if you haven’t got a chance to do so yet. Post your ideas here. The deadline is this Friday, Sep. 4 at 11:59pm.
  3. Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.

Day 06

Some of you have already posted on the Genius Hour idea sharing Padlet wall, and I’m really impressed. I almost can’t wait to see your projects come to fruition. And it’s good that we have a semester for that! If you haven’t posted yet, please keep working on it! And remember that you have two weeks for your first Genius Hour blog post.

Today we are going to back off from technology just a little bit to take a closer look at learning and how instruction can be designed to improve learning. If you’ve read the optional reading from Wednesday, you already know that we are talking about Universal Design for Learning (UDL).

Tweeter of the Day

I will randomly choose one person to be our Tweeter of the Day. This person will tweet texts and pictures about our learning activities to his or her Twitter account with the hashtag #edit2000. Each person will be the Tweeter of the Day at least twice this semester.

Consider this as a push for you to use Twitter more often. This also helps your classmates who would unfortunately miss some classes. Remember to be professional when you tweet.

Also, in general, just tweet or retweet more frequently. Your tweets are timp-stamped, so make sure you don’t only tweet when I check your work at the end of the semester. Start doing it, now.

The average learner

Describe the average learner (best with adjectives or short phrases). Work by yourself for 2 mins, and then work with 3 to 4 people around you. Post your group’s descriptions of the average learner here.

UDL

Let’s watch a video introduction to UDL from none other than the pioneer of UDL himself–David Rose.

The 3 key principles of UDL:

  • Provide multiple means of representation
  • Provide multiple means of action and expression
  • Provide multiple means of engagement

Warm-up activity

So learners are different. But how do you understand these differences? Here’s an activity to experience just that:

Suppose we are designers for an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). It can move in 6 directions according to the command of the operator. The only problem: The vision of the operator is limited to the video feed from the camera attached to the ROV.

For this activity we need two volunteers: One to play the ROV with a camera, the other the operator who can only send verbal command. The operator should face away from the ROV so the video feed will be his/her only source of information. Since it is possible for the “ROV” to run into obstacles (tables in this room), this is a potentially dangerous role to play, so take that into consideration when you volunteer.

Other people can either observe the video feed or the ROV in action. But please don’t comment or interrupt the communication between the operator and the ROV.

(This example is adapted from Chapter 10 of Design Interactions)

Multiple means of representation

Have you watched Interstellar? (Spoilers!) What do you think about ending where Cooper fell into a blackhole and interacted with his daughter Murph through the 5th dimension? Can you explain it?

  1. Here is a textual explanation.
  2. And here’s an explanation done in video (and words, of course).

Math problems in Japanese

???
(image source)

Yes! This is a math problem, although you are not seeing even one number in it. You can try a Google Translate. Makes sense now? No?

How about this one? Now there are some numbers.

330Yen
Click to enlarge. (source)

Again, Google Translate is doing its job (?)

Preparing for Week 03

  1. Work on your Genius Hour ideas if you haven’t got a chance to do so yet. Post your ideas here.
  2. Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.

Day 05

Please get into groups with your group mates from Monday.

Meaningful learning

Step 1 continued…

Take a look at our work from Monday. Check out the ideas from other groups.

Here are some questions/problems for you to consider:

  • There is a misunderstanding of what “constructive” is.
    from Merriam-Webster:

2:  of or relating to construction or creation

3:  promoting improvement or development <constructive criticism>
  • Does “active” already imply focus? Can learning take place without actively paying attention?
  • Intention –> fulfillment (If you learn intentionally for a test, does it count?)
  • Real world in general? Or our real world? Real world vs. context
  • Cooperation vs. collaboration

Let’s check out this video and see if we can identify some/all of the characteristics for meaningful learning.

Step 2: Now we will form groups of 5 (or 6) so each group will have experts on each of the five characteristics. In Step 1 I asked you if one of the characteristics would be enough for meaningful learning. It sounded rhetorical. Of course not! But… we’ll see that there is no need for an educational activity to cover all five characteristics. So try to design an activity that best represent the ideas of meaningful learning (according to the understanding of your group, and explain why you leave some of the characteristics out).

You do not have to agree with your group members. The aim of this activity is for you collaborate, to gather ideas and advice from your classmates. Hopefully these ideas will feed into your Genius Hour project.

Post your ideas as groups here.

Researching ideas for your Genius Hour

By now you should have had some ideas on the problems today’s learners and educators are facing. Or maybe you still need to research a little (using Twitter, for example) about the matter. The Genius Hour project is a semester-long project that helps you and allows you to think meaningfully about educational problems that are of personal interest to you, and hopefully, you will find creative solutions.

The Genius Hour exists for another reason. According to the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL, which we will discuss on Friday), we try to provide multiple means of engagement. This is why we want the Genius Hour to be yours, and not simply what the instructors assign you to do. Similar ideas may have already appeared in your other classes. Think about the differences they make to your learning experience.

Guidelines:

  1. Search for #geniushour on Twitter and see what you can find.
  2. Since this is EDIT 2000 Teaching with Technology, your Genius Hour topic does need to be about technology integration into education.
  3. Take a look at previous projects like this.
  4. Read about different topics related to K12 technology integration in two excellent resources: The New Media Consortium (NMC) Horizon Report 2015 K12 Edition (pdf). You don’t need to read the entire thing. Just skim through and see what interests you. The National Educational Technology Plan–you don’t need to read the entire plan. The Introduction will be enough to get you started. But you may want to come back to one or both of these once you start writing about your topic.
  5. Post a short description of what your interests are on this Padlet wall (by next Friday, Sep. 4 at 11:59pm). This counts towards your grade for the first Genius Hour blog post.
  6. Create a blog at http://www.wordpress.com Take a few minutes to think of an appropriate name for your blog–something related to your Genius Hour Project. Please note that you will need to reply to the confirmation email that WordPress sends you before you will be able to post anything.
  7. If you need help creating your blog, log in to: http://eits.uga.edu/learning_and_training/lynda with your UGA MyID. Search for “WordPress Essential Training” and choose relevant videos to show you what you need to know.
  8. For this first post, talk about your question that you want to investigate–why you chose it, how it’s relevant to your own life, how it’s relevant to K12 education, who else will be interested in your question, where you will start looking for answers. Also include relevant people to follow on Twitter and relevant hashtags. Your post should be 3-4 paragraphs. Make sure to publish your post or we won’t be able to see it. (You have two weeks, and I’ll remind you by next Friday, Sep. 4.)
  9. Add a link to your blog on your about.me page (WordPress can be added as an app or as a link–it’s up to you).

Preparing for Friday

  1. Make sure you have written down the important dates for your first Genius Hour blog post in your calendar. Guidelines 5 and 6 8 are particularly relevant here. (This post is worth 2% of your grade, so do take it seriously, but don’t be nervous about it.)
  2. Have you told me your About.me portfolio and Twitter handle already? Fill out this Google form so I can have access to your portfolio and follow you on Twitter.
  3. We are going to talk about UDL on Friday. Check this out and see if you are intrigued. This is not a required reading, but some knowledge before the class is always helpful 🙂
  4. Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.

Day 04

Welcome to the 2nd week of EDIT 2000! I hope you’ve been doing well so far.

One thing before we start: The name list is placed on the desk beside the wall. Please sign your names in the corresponding blanks when you arrive.

The list will be removed 10 minutes into the class, so don’t be late for class for more than 10 minutes, or you will be marked “absent”, and your grade will possibly be affected (see our syllabus for details).

Reflecting on Week 01

We got some hands-on experience with education and technology. The activities you did foreshadow the projects we will be doing some time this semester. The Project List will give you a better idea of what we are going to do. You should also be able to see the connection between the projects we’ll do and the ISTE standards you read about in our reading.

Spheros and Little Bits

About.me portfolio

In EDIT 2000 we use the portfolio for two main purposes:

  1. The portfolio will serve as a hub of your work in EDIT 2000
  2. It will be the starting point of your future professional portfolios

What we will do in class:

  1. I will help breaking you up into groups with an RNG (random number generator)
  2. Within each group, please show your group members your portfolio; and if you haven’t had a chance to introduce yourself yet, this is a good time to do so
  3. You also remember that during the first class meeting, you proposed personal background stories, your experience with technology, and your dream jobs for self introduction. This can also be a time for that.
  4. Most importantly, I want you to look for the good and the bad in your classmates’ portfolios. Learn from their wisdom and mistakes to make your own portfolio better.

We will discuss No. 4 after we’ve shared our portfolios, and I will be calling names with the help of RNG again, so be prepared.

Twitter

Most of you have been using social networking software. Not many of you have (regularly) used Twitter. The following are the reasons why we’re using Twitter in EDIT 2000:

  1. To establish your professional presence
  2. Twitter is a good channel of getting information on education (because other people have established their professional presence on the internet)
  3. To generate ideas for your Genius Hour project (We’ll take a look at it on Wednesday)

So make sure you all have set up a professional Twitter account, and followed some people in the field of education. Here is a list of people you can follow:

For the classroom:

@plemmonsa
@stumpteacher
@MagicPantsJones
@ilovethisclass

For policies:

@isteconnects
@officeofedtech
@arneduncan
@ajcgetschooled
@gadoenews

We will also start the semester-long “Tweeter of the Day” activity next week, where one student will serve as the Tweeter of the Day twice during the semester, and tweet what you think are important in our EDIT 2000 class as we are having class. So get familiar with Twitter before next week! And remember, be professional.

Meaningful learning

Most of you have already read the chapter and filled out the response form. Good job! You should be pretty familiar with these words now:

  • Active
  • Constructive
  • Cooperative
  • Authentic
  • Intentional

Let’s take a look at this video and see if you can identify some or all of them. Call out the concepts when you see them!

Discussion

Most of you mentioned that meaningful learning is not memorizing. But do you have to resort to memorization for these characteristics? We’ll try to do better, and the following is how:

Step 1: Now let’s get into 5 groups. Each group will focus on one of the meaningful learning characteristics. Discuss these questions:

  • What is my experience with this characteristic?
  • How is this characteristic important for meaningful learning?
  • Is this characteristic enough for meaningful learning? How does it situate among the other four?

For this task, I suggest that at least one group member act as a facilitator. Please record your ideas and publish on Padlet (pw: ouredit2000) as a group. When using Padlet, please remember to write down the characteristic for your group first. If you have relevant photos, you can share them on Padlet as well.

We will talk about your thoughts and findings in about 10 minutes.

Step 2: Now we will form groups of 5 (or 6) so each group will have experts on each of the five characteristics. Although there is no need for an educational activity to cover all five characteristics, try to design an activity that best represent the ideas of meaningful learning (according to the understanding of your group, and explain why you leave some of the characteristics out).

The late pass

It is my hope that you won’t ever need to use it… But, use it wisely if you have to.

Preparing for Wednesday

  1. Fill out this Google form so I can have access to your portfolio and follow you on Twitter.
  2. Share your ideas for our last activity (Step 2) here individually. Group members can share the same activity, but the reflections should still be individual). This can be used for your Genius Hour blog posts later. (This will be moved over to Wednesday)
  3. Complete this form for Reading 1 if you haven’t already done so (deadline: 11:59pm, Monday Aug. 24). From this point on I do not accept late work unless you use a late pass.
  4. Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.

Day 03

The first week is almost over! However chaotic it might have been, I hope it’s all behind you now.

The name list is on the desk by the wall. Please sign your name when you come in.

If you were not here earlier this week, please remember to check out the following:

  • Complete the student survey.
  • Send the text message “@edit13” to 81010 so you can receive emergence messages.

You may have noticed that I haven’t given out any late passes yet. I’ve decided to do that next week, when most things about this class are finalized.

A little reflection

On Wednesday, each of you already completed two activities. Did anything impress you? Have you found some answers to your questions from Day 1 (e.g., How to use technology for education)? Or have you run into new questions?

Day 2 continued

Today we’ll be doing the other 50% of the activities. You still remember whom you teamed up with last time, right? Groups 1 & 2 please switch over to Activities 3 & 4, and Groups 3 & 4 to Activities 1 & 2.

  1. SpherosCritical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Explore and program simple robots
  2. TwitterCommunication and Collaboration
    Set up a professional twitter account
  3. Little BitsCreativity and Innovation/Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    See what happens when you connect the components.
  4. Professional PortfolioCommunication and Collaboration
    Get started on your professional portfolio for class using about.me
  5. Genius Hour–Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Brainstorm ideas for a topic you’d like to explore this semester (We’ll do this one later since it needs more preparation than the previous ones)

Reminder: Please keep the accounts you’ve created for later use. We will be using Twitter and your profile frequently over the semester.

Preparing for next week

  1. If you haven’t already done so, read Chapter One from Howland, J., & Jonassen, D. (2012). Meaningful learning with technology (4th ed.). Boston: Pearson (like, three times). This chapter is the foundation for everything we will do this semester. Once you’ve read it–complete this Google Form to share what you’ve learned (deadline: 11:59 pm Sunday, Aug. 23).
  2. Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.

Have a nice weekend!

Day 02

Welcome back! See if you still remember your classmates and their names (the animals may help!), and if you have time before class, find someone to talk about some interesting stories of yours, your experience with technology, and your dream job(s). Also, thanks for completing the student survey. Before we start, please make sure to do the following if you haven’t already:

  • Complete the student survey.
  • Send the text message “@edit13” to 81010 so you can receive emergence messages.

The survey results

Things that you look forward to:

  • More in-depth understanding of technology in general–You will! Although we’ll be somewhat specific in the types of technology that we’ll cover.
  • Learn to use technology in the educational setting–You’ll see today!

Your most recent (memorable) experience with technology:

  • Your classes employed quite a lot of technology last year.
  • You used a specific kind of technology to achieve your goals.
  • You had this feeling that “Technology will play an ever bigger role in the classroom.”

Technology has made your learning/teaching life easier by allowing you to deliver the contents or express your ideas more efficiently than it could ever be.

Also, Excel and Word came up a lot 🙂 I have a feeling that we’ll venture into terra incognita, so get prepared.

Getting to know EDIT 2000 up close

Today we’ll get a hands-on experience of EDIT 2000 by doing 2 of the following projects. On Friday we will do another two.

  1. SpherosCritical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Explore and program simple robots
  2. TwitterCommunication and Collaboration
    Set up a professional twitter account and sign up to be Tweeter of the Day
  3. Little BitsCreativity and Innovation/Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    See what happens when you connect the components.
  4. Professional PortfolioCommunication and Collaboration
    Get started on your professional portfolio for class using about.me
  5. Genius Hour–Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
    Brainstorm ideas for a topic you’d like to explore this semester (We’ll do this one later since it needs more preparation than the previous ones)

Preparing for Friday

  1. Read Chapter One from Howland, J., & Jonassen, D. (2012). Meaningful learning with technology (4th ed.). Boston: Pearson (like, three times). This chapter is the foundation for everything we will do this semester. Once you’ve read it–complete this Google Form to share what you’ve learned (deadline: 11:59 pm Sunday, Aug. 23).
  2. Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.

Day 01

What is this course about?

Welcome to EDIT 2000! The name of the course in “teaching with technology”, but what it implies is “meaning learning” with technology. We’ll see what meaningful learning really is, but right now this understanding is good enough. For details, you can read our syllabus.

Who’s your instructor

I’m Lechuan Huang, a first year doctoral student in the Learning, Design, and Technology program, and one of the TA’s of this course. I come from China, where I taught high school students for 5+ years. I taught economics, but it is the learning process that really fascinates me. What makes young people want to learn? How does understanding take place? Why do some people appear more capable at this thing called “academics”? I’m on my way of finding the answer, and that answer involves the use of technology in the learning environment.

My office is at 613B Aderhold Hall. Office hour is set up by appointment. I can be reached by email at lh81655@uga.edu.

What materials do you need?

This course requires no text books. Most often you’ll need computers and mobile devices. If you don’t bring your own laptop to the lab, you can always borrow one from the lab. Just make sure you put them back when you leave. More importantly, you’ll need an open mind to explore and try out things.

What will you be doing this semester?

This course has a Project-Based Learning (PBL) focus, so you’ll be doing a lot of projects, big and small. The projects fall under some overarching themes:

  • Communication and collaboration
  • Creativity and innovation
  • Critical thinking, research, and problem solving
  • On-going projects (such as the Genius Hour)

Getting to know each other

We probably wouldn’t need to use the name plates for long, but for the time being, let’s bring this little creation of yours to the class so your classmates will have a greater chance at remembering your name.

Preparing for the next class

  1. Please fill out this student survey.
  2. Send the text message “@edit13” to 81010 so you can receive emergence messages (such as cancelled class) from me.
  3. Talk to me before you leave, or via email: lh81655@uga.edu, if you have questions or concerns about this course.